Tuesday, May 25, 2010

ROBINSON CRUSOE THEME

Courage and Determination
Robinson Crusoe’s parents want him to become a lawyer but Crusoe is determined to become a sailor. He leaves home without his parents’ blessing and works hard to become a good sailor.
He shows great courage when he escapes from his Turkish master. He ensures he has guns and food before he escapes. When he is shipwrecked on a deserted island, Crusoe overcomes great
obstacles to survive. He struggles alone in order to carry food, equipment and other materials from the ship so that he can make a life for himself until he is rescued. He builds two homes, a raft and a canoe. He is also able to make tools and plant enough food for himself and his companions. He shows great courage when he saves Friday, Friday’s father, the Spaniard
and the second English sea captain. He does all this at the risk of being captured and eaten by the cannibals!
Importance of Hard Work
It is important to work hard as this makes you disciplined and successful in life. Robinson Crusoe is a good example of a man who is fearless, positive and hard-working. Instead of complaining about his fate, he looks at the situation and does what is needed to make the situation
better. For example, he salvages useful items from the sinking ship, makes a canoe and safe shelters for himself, and hunt for food. He creates a comfortable life for himself and is able to survive on the island for twenty-eight years.

Friendship and Loyalty
Humans need friendship and good relationships with others. When Crusoe runs away to London, he makes friends with a ship’s captain who grows to like and trust him. He teaches
Crusoe mathematics and navigation until Crusoe becomes a good sailor. Crusoe is a friendly and sociable person. The captain invites Crusoe to go with him to Guinea, thus starting Crusoe’s involvement in business and sailing. Crusoe also makes many friends while farming in Brazil.
When Crusoe gets shipwrecked on the island, he is desolate and miserable. Deprived of human company, he finds comfort and companionship with two dogs he rescues from the shipwreck,
the parrot and the cats. During his twenty-fifth year on the island, he manages to
save a savage from a group of cannibals who land on the island. This man is so grateful that he wants to be Crusoe’s slave. However, Crusoe prefers him to be a friend. Crusoe teaches
him to eat animal flesh, speak English and share his religious beliefs. Friday, as Crusoe calls him, becomes his faithful companion and friend. Crusoe also becomes a friend to the Spanish and English mutineers who were left on the island. He solves their disputes and helps them to form friendships with each other.

Relationship with Nature
Humans are part of Nature and, therefore, should live and work harmony with Nature. Crusoe is a man at peace with Nature. He loves the sea and the outdoors. So when he is marooned
on the island and finds himself alone with only Nature as his companion, he adapts easily.
He is quick to use things from Nature to help him survive. He uses the trees and plants to build himself a canoe and homes, ant to provide him with food.



Sub-Themes / Minor Themes

Gratitude
Friday is dedicated to Crusoe, the man who saves him from being eaten by the cannibals.
The second English ship’s captain is grateful to Crusoe for rescuing him from the mutineers.

Power and Control
Crusoe lives on the deserted island for twenty-eight years. He makes it his comfortable home. He has control over Nature there. During his rescue of Friday, he kills a cannibal. A grateful Friday is willing to be his slave. Crusoe teaches Friday to speak in English and about his religious beliefs. Thus, Crusoe has power over Friday. Crusoe is viewed as owner and lord of the island. Crusoe is also able to bring peace between the Spanish and the English living on the island. He divides the island between the two groups and this proves his control over the island and its inhabitants.

Faith in God
Robinson Crusoe has great faith in God. He does not give up hope when he is shipwrecked and finds himself all alone on a deserted island. His faith that God will sustain him
through the many trials in life keeps him going. Crusoe says, ‘All… God for an answer.” (p. 41, para. 3) Crusoe’s strong belief in God is also seen when he teaches Friday about the goodness and power that comes with having faith in God.

Good versus Evil
Robinson Crusoe shows that good triumphs over evil when he helps Friday to escape from the cannibals. Crusoe also teaches Friday about God’s goodness and how it triumphs over the Devil’s evilness. The mutineers who are disloyal to their captain are finally overcome by the ‘good’ forces of Crusoe and Friday.

Thursday, May 20, 2010

Leopard vs. Poodle Joke

Posted in Animal Jokes

A wealthy old lady decides to go on a photo safari in Africa, taking her poodle along for company.

One day the poodle starts chasing butterflies and before long, discovers that he’s lost. Wandering about, he notices a hungry-looking leopard heading rapidly in his direction.

The poodle thinks, “Oh, oh!” Noticing some bones on the ground close by, he immediately settles down to chew on the bones with his back to the approaching cat. Just as the leopard is about to leap, the poodle exclaims loudly, “Boy, that was one delicious leopard! I wonder if there are any more around here?”

Hearing this, the leopard halts his attack in mid-strike, a look of terror comes over him and he slinks away into the trees. “Whew!”, says the leopard, “That was close! That poodle nearly had me!”

Meanwhile, a monkey who had been watching the whole scene from a nearby tree, figures he can put this knowledge to good use and trade it for protection from the leopard. So off he goes, but the poodle sees him heading after the leopard with great speed, and figures that something must be up. The monkey soon catches up with the leopard, spills the beans and strikes a deal for himself with the leopard.

The leopard is furious at being made a fool of and says, “Here, monkey, hop on my back so you can watch me chew that poodle to bits!”

Now, the poodle sees the leopard coming with the monkey on his back and thinks, “What am I going to do now?”, but instead of running, the dog sits down with his back to his attackers, pretending he hasn’t seen them yet, and waits until they get just close enough to hear.

“Where’s that damn monkey?” the poodle says, “I sent him off an hour ago to bring me another leopard!”

Tuesday, May 11, 2010

DICTIONARY

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not compositional — that is, whose meaning does not follow from the meaning of the individual words of which it is composed. For example, the English phrase "to kick the bucket" means "to die". A listener knowing the meaning of kick and bucket will not necessarily be able to predict that the expression can mean to die. Idioms are often, though perhaps not universally, classified as figures of speech.

The part of speech that modifies a noun or other substantive by limiting, qualifying, or specifying and distinguished in English morphologically by one of several suffixes, such as -able, -ous, -er, and -est, or syntactically by position directly preceding a noun or nominal phrase.

adjective is a word which qualifies a noun, that is, shows or points out some distinguishing mark or feature of the

An expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up..noun.

Expressive of command; containing positive command; authoritatively or absolutely directive; commanding; authoritative; as, imperative orders.

Analogy is a cognitive process of transferring information from a particular subject (the analogue or source) to another particular subject.

An antonym is a word with the opposite meaning of another word.
For example, happy is an antonym of sad.
A word having the same or nearly the same meaning in one or more senses as another in the same language.

Thursday, May 6, 2010

plan your work work your plan

1.Idea (brainstorming)

2. 1 how 5 why

3. Do fish bone (mind map)

4. Do draft

5. Write

6. Read - Reread

7. Rewrite

Wednesday, May 5, 2010