Tuesday, May 11, 2010

DICTIONARY

An idiom is an expression whose meaning is not compositional — that is, whose meaning does not follow from the meaning of the individual words of which it is composed. For example, the English phrase "to kick the bucket" means "to die". A listener knowing the meaning of kick and bucket will not necessarily be able to predict that the expression can mean to die. Idioms are often, though perhaps not universally, classified as figures of speech.

The part of speech that modifies a noun or other substantive by limiting, qualifying, or specifying and distinguished in English morphologically by one of several suffixes, such as -able, -ous, -er, and -est, or syntactically by position directly preceding a noun or nominal phrase.

adjective is a word which qualifies a noun, that is, shows or points out some distinguishing mark or feature of the

An expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up..noun.

Expressive of command; containing positive command; authoritatively or absolutely directive; commanding; authoritative; as, imperative orders.

Analogy is a cognitive process of transferring information from a particular subject (the analogue or source) to another particular subject.

An antonym is a word with the opposite meaning of another word.
For example, happy is an antonym of sad.
A word having the same or nearly the same meaning in one or more senses as another in the same language.

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